News

CCA believes the current system of influence and power in national politics often favours the most economically powerful who benefit economically from certain policies.  These policies may or may not be in the broader public interest.  This bias towards the most powerful having more input into public policy is partly facilitated through political donations, but mostly operates outside of the disclosure regimes.

Charities that try and advocate for the benefit of community are often at a major disadvantage against very strong and powerful economic interests.

Charities will only realise their potential when they can collectively push the pendulum back away from “commodification” towards funding models that reward responsiveness and effectiveness, writes CEO of Community Council for Australia David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 12 October 2017.

Across Australia there are many beacons of excellence, lighthouse programs showing the way in so many communities. Unfortunately, most will not last, writes CCA CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 28 September 2017.  He goes on to offer seven ways to extend program life.

Over the coming month, major political parties will be deciding whether charities should be exempted from new restrictions on election campaigning to be introduced as part of reforms to overseas donations to political parties. Charites should not be treated like other political actors, argues CCA CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 14 September 2017.

Public Interest / Private Interest – A Fundamental Distinction

The Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters - Inquiry into and report on all aspects of the conduct of the 2016 Federal Election and matters related thereto – including overseas donations and the role of third parties

CCA's  submission is based on a Position Paper developed in collaboration with the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) and Philanthropy Australia. 

Charities are an expression of trust in our communities and our democracy, yet trust is declining in Australia and worldwide. So we must continue to honour and enhance the trust charities enjoy if we are to be an effective antidote against increased fear and loss of hope, writes CEO of Community Council for Australia, David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 31 August 2017:

Tim Costello talks about the mess of fundraising regulation that is costing millions.  We can fix it now.  With minor amendments to the Australian Consumer Law and the work of the ACNC. 

Consumer Affairs Ministers are meeting on 31 August. It's time for regulation that works.  Improved accountability.  Improved transparency.  More money going to work for communities. ABC News 24, 30 August 2017:

It's time to fix the out-dated, dog's breakfast of fundraising regulation that wastes millions.

It can be done.  With simple amendments to Australian Consumer Law.

Consumer Affairs Ministers are meeting on 31st August 2017.  The opportunity for real change is there and needs to be seized.  Charities want to do the right thing but the rules work against them.  With one fundraising regime as part of Australian Consumer Law, the problem can be fixed.  Let's fix fundraising. Now.

The Saturday Paper, 19 August 2017, News

Mike Seccombe reports that the government is waging a multifaceted campaign to reduce the influence of charities, requiring disclosure of how donations are spent, seeking to ban electoral campaigning if overseas funds are received, and choosing not to renew the tenure of the respected head of the sector’s regulatory body.

There is much our current leaders could learn from the views of Australia’s longest serving prime minister, Sir Robert Menzies about how to make Australia a better place, writes Community Council for Australia CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, The Forgotten People, 17 August 2017.

 

Recent events in Australian politics have focused attention on internal divisions within the Liberal party and how differing ideologies play out in government policy.